Academic and aesthetic knowledge

.

Stephen Eastaugh Intimate Slots 2000

Stephen Eastaugh Intimate Slots 2000

Lisa Roberts, Turning cycles: Lorraine Beaulieu's from within Antarctica, 2008. Music by Rupert Summerson

Lisa Roberts, Turning cycles: Lorraine Beaulieu's from within Antarctica, 2008. Music by Rupert Summerson

Animation: Turning cycle

I agree with John Bechervaise who writes,

Unless a person has lived through the seasons within the astronomical limits of the polar Circle and experienced not only the midnight sun and the midday darkness but the slow transition of one to the other, his appreciation of some aspects is likely to be academic. The Far South, 1961, p.50

Aesthetic (sensory) knowledge comes from lived experience and is essential for fully understanding the meaning of the changes in Antarctica that are measured by scientists and other academics.

Stephen Eastaugh and Rupert Summerson are two of a very small number of artists who have wintered in Antarctica. What can art contribute to scientific understandings of Antarctica?

Stephen Eastaugh writes from Argentina (October 25):

What can art contribute to scientific understandings of Antarctica? Perhaps art is  just another view but not bogged down with data. Art is bogged down with emotion instead.  How art can contribute to science is not known to me but I am sure there is a little bit of art in most high level scientific activity. There may even be a little bit of science in some art work.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.


Bad Behavior has blocked 129 access attempts in the last 7 days.